Watercress, leek and potato Soup. 

Watercress, leek and potato Soup. 


Mmmmmmmmmmm….it’s winter! This must be one of my favorite flavor combinations as far as soup goes! It’s creamy, filling and so tasty. The watercress also gives it a peppery tang. 

It’s a one pot wonder and in under an hour, you have a really tasty dish!

Watercress, leek and potato soup

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy peasy
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Ingredients 

50g of butter

100g of watercress

800g of washed and cut leeks

6 medium potatoes (about 1kg) peeled and cut into discs

2L of good quality vegetable stock
Salt and pepper

Method

In a pot, add the butter and leave to melt, wait until it starts to foam, add your leeks and watercress. Sauté slightly.

Now add your potatoes and give it a big stir. Allow it to sauté and keep stirring it to avoid it sticking to the base of the pot.

Add your stock and bring it up to the boil.

I then turn it down to a simmer, and in about 30 minutes your potatoes will be soft enough to blend the entire mix.

Add to a blender in batches and blend until smooth. I season with pink Himalayan salt and fresh black pepper.

A little tip to keep soups interesting is adding a pesto drizzle instead of cream when you serve it.

I made a quick sundried tomato and pea pesto to serve with this soup.

The base for pesto is always the same

  • Olive oil 
  • Parmesan 
  • Pine nuts (or blanched almonds) 
  • Garlic
  • A herb of choice, and 
  • Seasoning 

I find that you don’t need to use herbs, as pulses, like peas and edamame work really well in place of them. Sundried tomatoes take on an almost “meaty” texture, so it tricks your mind into thinking that the soup might be meat based!

Bon appetite ❤️🍴

Pumpkin Patch

Pumpkin Patch

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There comes a time, when the recipes or food of your “growing up years”, bring back such amazing memories and mouth watering conversations that you find yourself falling in love with the simplest of ingredients. 

Take pumpkin fritters for example. These were a Sunday staple. After lunch my grandmother would bring out the already made mix and start frying them, laced with cinnamon and nutmeg, covered with a generous dusting of cinnamon sugar, they never really made it out onto the table, as we all clamored around her and ate them as they came out of the frying pan. Albeit, shallow fried in oil and clinging with calories, who cared? They were yummy, soft, delicious, warm, mouthfuls of simple, sticky, amazingness.

So, being a chef, I’ve loved my grandmothers fritters, for many years, and have taken the concept of her recipe, and adapted it to make my own. Mine are deep fried and are more of a doughnut texture, but taste just as amazing. I think it also just goes with what you prefer. The shallow fried variety that most of us grew up on or going with a different take on the fritter and seeing which one your like best.

Pumpkin Bites

  • Servings: makes about 20-30 bites
  • Difficulty: easy
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Ingredients

2 cups of pumpkin (boiled and “dried” in a hot pan)

2 cups of flour

4 tsps of baking powder

2 eggs

1/2 cup of milk

Pinch of salt

1 tsp each of cinnamon, ground all spice, nutmeg

A bowl of cinnamon sugar (about 400g)

Method

Place all ingredients into a food processor and process on high until combined. You might need to scrap down the sides, and then mix again.


You end up with a sticky batter, that is ready for deep frying. Get your oil to 180C and start adding spoonfuls of the mix to the heated oil. They fry really quickly and will pop to the surface of the oil, you will need to bob them slightly to turn them so that they get golden on all sides.

Take them out of the oil and drain on paper towel.

Now generously coat them in cinnamon sugar and serve them immediately!

If you are preparing them to serve at a later stage, don’t cover in sugar, you can heat them in a preheated oven (180C) for 10 minutes and them coat them in the sugar.

 


Best served as a dessert by themselves or as a side to roast chicken or turkey!

❤️🍴

The Winter blues

The Winter blues

 

I’m a summer baby, on every level. Although it’s a catch 22, because I don’t like getting hot! Ok. So let me figure this out, I like the sun, the smell of sunscreen, the salty taste of the ocean on my lips, and the sand between my toes…but I’d prefer to be laying on a sun lounger next to a sparkling swimming pool, with a cocktail in hand. 

With that being said, I love the late nights, the vibe that summer evokes in a city, the reckless abandon of hair and makeup, because nothing beats a summer glow, meeting new people, and summer seems to be the only season where I can go to sleep way past witching hour, but wake up just as the sun starts peeking it’s rays through my window, as to not miss out on the day ahead. 

I love lazy breakfasts and long lunches, sitting and eating, sipping on cold bubbly or crisp white wine, under a tree or on a blanket. I love the summer evenings that turn into a quick braai on the deck and then everything eaten with your hands, that takes finger licking good to a new dimension. 

So come winter, I feel like I need to hibernate like the bears do, so that I don’t have to be faced with the cold, the rain, the dark, the everything that this miserable season brings. I also do understand, that like most things, other people might love winter, but I’m not about that life. 

I am all about the food though. Roasts and stews, soups and loads of warm earthy vegetables. Fire places, huge blankets and hot chocolate. Snuggling and cuddling. Those all work for me! 

So as winter approaches for us in the Southern Hemisphere, my blog will be filled with comfort food recipes and tricks. Those that make you feel like you shouldn’t be eating the dish, but it’s so good and warm and satisfying that you just think “oh what the hell!” and make you think that winter is not so bad after all! 

❤️🍴